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How to spot heatstroke

With the rising temperatures it is important to recognize the signs of heatstroke in your dogs.
Here are some warning signs:
What are the signs of heatstroke?
heatstroke

Signs of heatstroke include:

Increased heart rate
Excessive panting
Increased salivation
Bright red tongue
Red or pale gums
Thick, sticky saliva
Depression
Weakness
Dizziness
Vomiting (sometimes with blood)
Diarrhea
As heatstroke progresses, it can cause seizures, coma, cardiac arrest, and death.

In the above video you see a police dog out working in the heat. The handler was able to recognize the signs and get the dog the emergency treatment it needed. It is important to realize that the signs may be hard to spot and the dog could still be trying to go after things or play with other dogs even though the internal body temperature reaches dangerous levels.

House Training Concepts

House training House Training Basic Concepts-

One of the most confusing and anxiety-ridden areas of dog training is house training yet it is one of the most important, especially for the humans involved. The best way to understand and find success with house training is to use the dog’s own nature to help you. Dogs are, by instinct, very clean animals. They would rather not soil any areas where they normally sleep or eat. Dogs are also creatures of habit — they like to know where they’re supposed to go urinate and defecate. If the dog is taught to eliminate on gravel or concrete, they will tend to look for either of those surfaces to do so. If they’re taught to eliminate on grass or dirt, that’s where they will choose. Use these habits to your advantage.

Setting Up The Training Area This is the first step-

Make sure the area you choose is small and confined. A bathroom works for this, or a place in a kitchen or garage also work well. Remember that crate training works well for puppies or small dogs, but for the larger animals, a crate can be too confining. You need to spend some time with this aspect of the training. You need to play with your dog in this area, and this is also where the dog will be taught to sleep and eat. Put together a special bed. This can be something you make up with items around the house, or you can go to the store and purchase a bed. Don’t worry if your dog eliminates in this area at first. Once they figure out that this is where the sleep and eat, they’ll stop eliminating there. Once your dog realizes that the bed is for sleeping, you can begin to move it around the house, but only when you’re there. When you’re not, put the bed back in the training area.

Setting Up The Toilet Area-

Now you need to determine where the toilet area is going to be located. Presumably, this will be outside the house. Wherever it is, it has to a place that the dog can go to whenever it needs to go. You need to go there with your dog so you can give the appropriate rewards for good behavior. Establish a set feeding schedule for your dog. If the dog is in the habit of being fed at certain times, the natural process of elimination will also begin to occur at certain times. Once you learn when those times relate to the eating times, it will become much easier for you to guide the dog to the established toilet area. Don’t forget to make sure your dog has ready access to the toilet area.
That way mistakes aren’t as likely to occur.

Continuing The House Training Process-

Once your dog is in the habit of eliminating in the toilet area and not in the sleeping/eating area, you can begin to extend the training area to the rest of the house. Do this slowly. Start by expanding to one additional room, and then gradually expand into other areas. Don’t expand into new areas until you’re sure your dog has control of its bladder and bowels. At first, do this only when you’re around. If you’re away, then put your dog back in the original training area.

Speeding Up The Process-

If you have to move this process along more quickly, you can do so. Remember to proceed with caution, though. It’s better to go slowly than to have to try to retrain a dog later. If you’re going to try to speed things up, you will have to be there in order to reward your dog for successful eliminations. It is also important not to punish for mistakes. That will only confuse the dog and slow the process even further.

House Training Tips From Animal Behaviorists-

Generally, dogs are very clean animals – they won’t soil close to where they eat, or where they sleep. But living in a house is unnatural for an animal whose instincts would be to roam wherever she wants to go, so you will have to help her learn where and when she can relieve herself. It is essential that you form good toilet habits for your dog as early on as possible. Trying to break the habit of a dog is quite difficult and it can be very frustrating. You need to use guidance and encouragement to help the pet. Animal behaviorists have some helpful tips that you can use to help with the housebreaking of your pet. Believe it or not, dogs are sanitary creatures. If a dog does soil accidentally in the wrong place, it is likely that it will be far from his dog dish, at least six to ten feet. This is true for the place where the dog sleeps as well. But, unless you find a good place for her to go and train her in that manner, the rest of your house is okay to them. The process for housebreaking a dog is the same if he is a puppy or an adult dog new to your home. You’ll need to take him outside every few hours and also 30 minutes after he eats. Take your pet to the designated bathroom spot. Stay with the pet until she goes, and then praise her when she does. If she does not go, bring her back inside and try again in fifteen minutes. Watch her though. If the dog starts sniffing and circling take them out right away as this is a sign that she is about to go. Pay attention to her signs and take her out. Soon, she will relate to going outside to going to the bathroom.

Some dogs are housebroken much faster than others. A dog’s personality can cause her to learn faster or slower. But, if you take her outside at the right time, it will go smoother. A puppy of less than four months old will need to go out during the night. Older puppies can hold it that long. A dog that cries to be let out has an urgent need. Get up and take her out, she needs every chance to succeed that she can get. Positive reinforcement is necessary for success. How you treat accidents will affect your dog’s overall learning curve. If you catch your dog going in the act, distract her with a clap or call her name. Take her outside calmly at that time and praise her for finishing outside. Clean up any accident that you find on the floor, using disinfectant or specially designed chemicals for removing the specific smell. If the dog approaches during this time, ignore her. Don’t talk to or punish her at this point. The worst thing that you can do is to yell at her or physically punish her. This will cause her to fear you and to not bond as well to you. She won’t connect it to the accident at all. Ignoring her is the best course of action here.

Dog Shampoo Recipe

Homemade Dog Shampoo Recipe

In a 1 gallon jug mix:

32-oz of Ivory or Joy (Lemon) dishwashing liquid

1 cup of white vinegar

1/2 cup of glycerin

fill remainder of gallon with water and mix well.